Christophe Robin Cleansing Purifying Scrub with Sea Salt

I’ve been taking my highlights lighter and lighter, and as a side-effect my scalp has become super dry from the bleach. Robin’s salt scrub has been on my to-do list for some time but with the $50+ price tag I wanted to try it before I splurged on it.

Into Sephora I went to get myself a few samples of the salty/oily goop. I was hesitant to say the least. How was this salt scrub going to cure my itchy scalp? Interestingly, the scrub is aimed at sensitive and oily hair types – and it’s recommended for use after coloring, when the scalp may feel a little itchy and irritated. One use of this and the head will be at optimum hydration within 24 hours. It also works to rebalance oily scalps, remove chemical residues left behind, and offer 100% natural hydration that lasts long after the hair has been rinsed. It’s pretty awesome stuff.

I tend to think these products are quite harsh on colored hair and should be avoided, but this doesn’t mention anything about avoiding dyed locks. As it’s a treatment, it is only used once every week or two weeks, so I think it’s used infrequently enough for any negative effects.

One use and my hair and scalp were… incredible! It was full of life, bursting with body at the roots and my itchy scalp? Gone!

I use it to substitute shampoo once a week. It gives a very mild exfoliation to the scalp and relieves mild irritation as well. It washes off all the build up and the impurities left on the scalp. During washing, the sensation is quite bizarre and is very different to any other shampoo I have used. The texture is like a thick paste and is not easy to massage over. It makes the hair tangle a little due to the sea salt, but it can be fixed with lots of conditioner. What I love about this product is that it makes the hair feel so clean without drying the scalp, and my hair feels weightless, healthy with lots of volume. It is also great for post hair coloring, as it thoroughly removes the color residuals, and eliminates all the irritants left on the scalp which may cause sensitivity.

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Brown Sugar Cookies

brown sugar cookiesIf you’re the type of person who likes chocolate chip cookie dough minus the chocolate, then you’ll LOVE these cookies. Soft, chewy, buttery and sweet, it is everything you’ll want in a cookie.

INGREDIENTS
1 1/2 sticks (6 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 1/4 cups dark brown sugar
1 large egg, at room temperature
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 tsp vanilla

PREPARATION

Preheat the oven to 375°F.

Place the butter and sugar in the bowl of a mixer fitted with a paddle and beat until smooth and creamy. Add the egg and beat well. Scrape down the sides of the bowl. Place the flour, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon in a separate bowl and mix well. Add to the butter mixture and beat until everything is well incorporated. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and beat again.

Drop large teaspoonfuls of dough onto an unbuttered cookie sheet about 2 inches apart and bake until the edges are just brown, 10 to 12 minutes. For crispy cookies, let cool on the sheet. Let the cookie sheet cool completely between batches and repeat with the remaining dough.

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Yes Ouai!

ouaiOuai, pronounced “way” is the line of hair care products by celebrity stylist, Jen Atkin. Now, she’s no ordinary celeb stylist. She’s been around for over a decade cutting and styling some of the most famous heads of hair in Hollywood. She was the go-to stylist for the Kardashian clan (but don’t hold that against her). She’s also styled the coifs of celebrities like Sofia Vergara, Jessica Alba, and Chrissy Teigen. She also founded Mane Addicts, a website and community showcasing stylist talent and education.

It isn’t surprising that when Atkin created Ouai, she had social media in mind. “I wanted it to look really pretty in the bathroom . . . have it be selfie-worthy.” She took inspiration from minimalist, elegant brands like Diptyque and Byredo for her aesthetic — she also drew from fragrance lines and her Hawaiian upbringing for the scent of her products.

“I love soft, expensive-smelling things,” she shared. Many of the products feature notes of gardenia, jasmine, and plumeria. Trust us me when I say that it smells incredible — like a freshly dry-cleaned cashmere throw and a pricey bouquet had a baby.

Why am I talking about Ouai? Because I stepped into my go-to salon this past week and my stylist said my hair was probably the healthiest it has been in YEARS! I felt like I had won an award. Hand me a trophy and let me do a victory lap! My stylist asked me what I had been doing and after rattling off the various vitamins, I mentioned Ouai. Specifically the ‘repair’ shampoo and conditioner and hair oil. The products are safe for chemically treated and keratin treated hair like mine.

When I was wearing my hair curly I used the soft mousse. No crunchy curls folks. Don’t get me started on finding a good mousse. I went through MANY bottles of mousse and all of them ended up in the trash except for Ouai’s! Hell apparently froze over.

Now, I am not going to tell you to run out and go buy it if scents bother you. Personally, I love the lingering heady scent but it’s not for everyone. One of the best parts about this line is that it isn’t tested on animals.

You can visit her site and purchase travel sized bottles of the products to give them a test drive but I am sure you won’t be disappointed!

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Mugler Spring 2017 RTW

The frenzied thrashing of strings from John Williams’s theme to Jaws washed over the audience as the last models left the catwalk. The song was a clue about David Koma’s inspiration for this Mugler collection. “I have this little obsession with sharks—their danger and their beauty,” he said backstage. You could certainly spot a streamlined shadow of the sharks flitting through the runway waters here. Dégradé paillettes glittered in sharkskin shades of gunmetal while patent flats with inset commando soles had the bullet-like shape of a great white’s nose.

Less elusive than Koma’s starting-point sharkiness was the influence of scuba and swimwear. There were black pants that fitted like wetsuits, with tidelines of white piping running down the leg. A cropped, shoulder-padded, sweatshirt-shaped sweater and mini skirt were reminiscent of that shark chainmail worn as insurance by undersea adrenaline hunters. Leather bonded to neoprene were used in white jackets with faux-utilitarian fastenings and gently rounded shoulders and arms. There were a lot of aesthetically-placed zippers designed to draw the eye to the thigh, neckline, or hip. Ultimately this was a broadly enjoyable collection of sleekly sexy, sports-inflected womenswear. Koma said that his main goal for this season was to have fun. He was certainly working within his comfort zone: treading water but in no need of rescue.

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